womenphotograph

Women Photograph An evergreen catalogue of independent women photojournalists. Working to elevate the voices of female + nonbinary visual storytellers. https://www.womenphotograph.com/
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Photo by @magdarakita from the project “my liver is bleeding” about post traumatic stress among the civilian population in afghanistan.
doctor alemi works a shift in the public hospital every morning and sees up to 120 patients in his private clinic every afternoon. during his lunch break, he answers phone calls from patients and their families seeking advice. many patients who live far away (some of those we met travelled as far as 700km) can’t afford frequent visits and rely on this remote advice. for the same reason the treatment is largely pharamacological. generic drugs are imported from india, pakistan or iran, and have to be cheap and available in the areas where patients live. if not, patients won’t be able to continue treatment, and many are not able to afford repeat trips to the hospital.
another challenge is recruiting qualified staff. some of the junior doctors want to leave afghanistan. he has managed to convince some of his children to take an interest in the hospital, where they now work.
estimated 40-60% of afghanistan’s civilian population suffers from post traumatic stress. yet few of those who seek treatment are actually diagnosed with it. symptoms of ptsd, like flashbacks, hyper-vigilance, or being suspicious or afraid to leave the house, are not considered particularly abnormal. what is considered abnormal in a communal society where large families often live under the same roof is for people to withdraw socially, or to suffer angry outbursts. thus, typically, people will be diagnosed with and treated for, major depressive disorder or anxiety.
another reason why ptsd isn’t more commonly diagnosed is that people are often reluctant to burden others with their problems. they have, after all, plenty problems of their own. as a result, people lose fluency in the ability to express themselves emotionally. they might say that their liver is bleeding, to indicate they are sad, or that their throat is tight to tell others they are feeling anxious or afraid.
many tell stories of experiencing conflict first-hand, even within the home environment. many will admit, the underlying cause of so much suffering is often endemic poverty and joblessness

comment 0 star 116 1 hour ago

Photo by @magdarakita from the project “my liver is bleeding” about post traumatic stress among the civilian population in afghanistan.
najeebullah was diagnosed with schizophrenia and drug-induced psychosis. before coming to the hospital, he had become increasingly aggressive and stabbed one of his family members. while medicine helped to calm him, the chain is there to prevent him from escaping. he is free to move around the hospital and its garden.
chaining those who become aggressive as a result of mental illness is often the only way families without access to treatment can protect themselves against the aggression, but it violates patient’s human rights and doesn’t resolve underlying health issues.

estimated 40-60% of afghanistan’s civilian population suffers from post traumatic stress. yet few of those who seek treatment are actually diagnosed with it. symptoms of ptsd, like flashbacks, hyper-vigilance, or being suspicious or afraid to leave the house, are not considered particularly abnormal. what is considered abnormal in a communal society where large families often live under the same roof is for people to withdraw socially, or to suffer angry outbursts. thus, typically, people will be diagnosed with and treated for, major depressive disorder or anxiety.
another reason why ptsd isn’t more commonly diagnosed is that people are often reluctant to burden others with their problems. they have, after all, plenty problems of their own. as a result, people lose fluency in the ability to express themselves emotionally. they might say that their liver is bleeding, to indicate they are sad, or that their throat is tight to tell others they are feeling anxious or afraid.
many tell stories of experiencing conflict first-hand, even within the home environment. many will admit, the underlying cause of so much suffering is often endemic poverty and joblessness.

comment 3 star 392 5 hours ago

Photo by @magdarakita from the project “my liver is bleeding” about post traumatic stress among the civilian population in afghanistan.
dr alemi examines an xray at his hospital – the first private hospital to specialise in neurological and psychological health in afghanistan. with a continuous stream of outpatients (who sometimes travel up to 700km to see him), there is little or no privacy. patients and their relatives are called into the consultation room where diagnosis and treatment are discussed in the presence of others waiting their turn. doctors use basic tests and x-ray to eliminate other potential causes of health problems. male patients have their vital signs checked behind the screen.
estimated 40-60% of afghanistan’s civilian population suffers from post traumatic stress. yet few of those who seek treatment are actually diagnosed with it. symptoms of ptsd, like flashbacks, hyper-vigilance, or being suspicious of afraid to leave the house, are not considered particularly abnormal. what is considered abnormal in a communal society where large families often live under the same roof is for people to withdraw socially, or to suffer angry outbursts. thus, typically, people will be diagnosed with, and treated for, major depressive disorder or anxiety.
another reason why ptsd isn’t more commonly diagnosed is that people are often reluctant to burden others with their problems. they have, after all, plenty problems of their own. as a result, people lose fluency in the ability to express themselves emotionally. they might say that their liver is bleeding, to indicate they are sad, or that their throat is tight to tell others they are feeling anxious or afraid.
many tell stories of experiencing conflict first-hand, even within the home environment. relatives talk of how they struggle to live with those who are mentally unstable, and how chaining them is often the only way they can protect themselves. that said, and as many will admit, the underlying cause of so much suffering is often endemic poverty and joblessness.
thank you for the opportunity to share my work on this platform.

comment 1 star 374 22 hours ago

Photo by @magdarakita from the project “my liver is bleeding” about post traumatic stress among the civilian population in afghanistan.
jummaghul rests in one of the private rooms at the hospital. in the past, she was often beaten by her husband, especially on her head, which her sister believes led to health problems. she divorced her husband about 10 years ago, but she rarely sees any of her 5 children, which causes her great distress. she now lives with her brother, who brought her to the hospital.
estimated 40-60% of afghanistan’s civilian population to suffer from post traumatic stress. yet few of those who seek treatment are actually diagnosed with it. symptoms of ptsd, like flashbacks, hyper-vigilance, or being suspicious of afraid to leave the house, are not considered particularly abnormal. what is considered abnormal in a communal society where large families often live under the same roof is for people to withdraw socially, or to suffer angry outbursts. thus, typically, people will be diagnosed with, and treated for, major depressive disorder or anxiety.
another reason why ptsd isn’t more commonly diagnosed is that people are often reluctant to burden others with their problems. they have, after all, plenty problems of their own. as a result, people lose fluency in the ability to express themselves emotionally. they might say that their liver is bleeding, to indicate they are sad, or that their throat is tight to tell others they are feeling anxious or afraid.
many tell stories of experiencing conflict first-hand, even within the home environment. relatives talk of how they struggle to live with those who are mentally unstable, and how chaining them is often the only way they can protect themselves. that said, and as many will admit, the underlying cause of so much suffering is often endemic poverty and joblessness.
thank you for the opportunity to share my work on this platform. it is a privilege to be a part of the @womenphotograph
community.

comment 4 star 599 Yesterday

Photo by: @heba__khamis
a 21-year-old refugee and his 71-year-old customer. from black birds project about g*y prostitution among refugees in berlin.

comment 10 star 1,381 2 days ago

Photo by: @heba__khamis “they keep telling me i am very pretty, they want to give me more work where i can earn 500 per day but i don’t want to do that kind of work” , roman said. he gets 239 euros as a social help. it all goes to pay his bills.

comment 5 star 737 2 days ago

Photo by: @heba__khamis
ahmed relaxing in the park. from black birds project about refugees g*y prostitution in berlin

comment 4 star 650 2 days ago

Photo by: @heba__khamis “heaven and earth cry when we do those stuff, what should i do? i don’t steal, i don’t disrespect people, but i have to earn money,,” ali said.
four days before the interview he got his passport and had been documented for the first time in his life, but still he couldn’t invite his parents to germany because he has no work and he can’t get a job until he finishes his studies.
"my father has cancer now and his time is limited," ali said, crying. one day after the interview, his father died.

comment 1 star 608 3 days ago

Photo by: @heba__khamis
his family sent him to europe to get better life. he got a negative answer for the visa and has to wait for the next interview. even though he never saw afghanistan, they are sending him there in case of deportation. he is still in contact with his family but he lies about his life, saying that he goes to school . from black birds project about refugees g*y prostitution in berlin

comment 2 star 627 3 days ago

Photo by : @heba__khamis
6 months ago, the peshmerga moved to the park after getting a negative answer for his visa . he is waiting for the second round of interviews, making a living through dealing drugs and hashish. from black birds project about refugees g*y prostitution in berlin

comment 1 star 537 4 days ago

Photo by : @heba__khamis
20-year-old mohamed has been dating a german man in his early seventies who is his customer for two months. from black birds project about refugees g*y prostitution in berlin.

comment 3 star 853 4 days ago

Photo by: @heba__khamis
winnie, 23, holds her daughter. winnie was running away from her grandmother, hiding in the bushes. winnie’s grandmother used to send her uncle to bring her back where he r***d her twice. she had her child at the age of 17 and couldn’t breastfeed her baby

comment 10 star 1,248 4 days ago